Lost and found

Lost and found is a villanelle, a rather old-fashioned poetic form which is 19 lines long and consists of five tercets and a closing quatrain. It depends on the repeated use of two lines. These two lines appear four times each and again at the very end. The Villanelle originated in France and entered the English language in the 1800s.

Lost and found

I realise now what I have lost
Is not as much as I have found,
Yet still I have to count the cost
Of losing what I valued most.
As life and death get swapped around
I ask myself, ‘what have I lost?’
Like dreams on stormy oceans tossed,
Then flung upon the stony ground,
Yet still I have to count the cost
Which no-one can regain once lost.
My voice can speak, but make no sound
When realising what I have lost.
Then winter comes with snow and frost
And hardens hearts on stony ground,
Yet still I have to count the cost
Of love when I have loved the most
And lost the love that I have found.
I realise now what I have lost
But still I have to count the cost

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